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Venues

Results 1–30 of 53.

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Saturday, Sept. 24 (See map view)

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Bill Helmreich leads a short tour of Park Slope, then returns to the bookstore to discuss his urban walking guide to Brooklyn. 4:30 pm.

Sunday, Sept. 25 (See map view)

Elanna Allen (creator of Poor Little Guy) What do you do when you’re so tiny that the bigger creatures in the ocean think you might even taste adorable? There’s just one solution… Keep a HUGE surprise up your sleeve! RSVP requested. 11:30 am.

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Tuesday, Sept. 27 (See map view)

Kelly Barnhill reads from her new fantasy novel about a good witch, a tiny dragon, and a girl with magic she cannot control. 4 pm.

Saturday, Oct. 1 (See map view)

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Sunday, Oct. 2 (See map view)

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Monday, Oct. 3 (See map view)

Celebrate the holiday with a ride on the Park’s beloved 1912 carousel. Noon to 5 pm.

Get out and get moving this Rosh Hashanah on this special day where the whole family can participate in potato sack races, spoon races, stilts and other old fashioned games. 2 pm to 4 pm.

Saturday, Oct. 8 (See map view)

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Sunday, Oct. 9 (See map view)

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

The Inquisitor’s Tale by Adam Gidwitz -The bestselling author of A Tale Dark and Grimm takes on medieval times in an exciting and hilarious new adventure about history, religion…and farting dragons. Meet the author at this special book event! RSVP requested. 4 pm.

Monday, Oct. 10 (See map view)

Celebrate this Columbus Day with this version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Saturday, Oct. 15 (See map view)

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Sunday, Oct. 16 (See map view)

Illustrator Lori Richmond reads her new picture book about a young boy, his energetic puppy, and the friends they encounter on their afternoon walk around town. Reservations requested. 11:30 am.

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Saturday, Oct. 22 (See map view)

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Sunday, Oct. 23 (See map view)

Joshua David Stein and Julia Rotham (author and illustrator of Can I Eat That?) lead this week’s event. A whimsical – yet factual –series of questions and answers about the things we eat…and don’t eat! Reservations requested. 11:30 am.

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Saturday, Oct. 29 (See map view)

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Sunday, Oct. 30 (See map view)

Get ready for Halloween with Bob Shea’s new picture book, Quit Calling Me a Monster, which puts a new spin on theso called scary ghouls that haunt us on October 31st.Reservations requested. 11:30 am.

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Monday, Oct. 31 (See map view)

The annual Park Slope Civic Council Halloween Parade has been going strong since 1986, and it’s perfect for families. Each year has a theme, and this year’s is “Daring Duos, Thrilling Trios and Superb Heroes!” The kickoff is at 6:30pm sharp at Seventh Avenue and 14th Street. The parade ends at the Old Stone House at Washington Park, with a little post-parade dancing at J.J. Byrne Playground. Feel free to gather with your family around 4pm, as many families and merchants begin greeting trick or treaters on Seventh and Fifth Avenues (yippee!). You never know what kind of spooks you’ll see at this festive celebration, and the costumes get increasingly inventive with each passing year-—so bring your A-game. All ages. 6:30 pm.

Saturday, Nov. 5 (See map view)

This version based on the Brothers Grimm fairytale is adapted into a gentler version and tells the story of two beloved children lost in the wood after a bird eats their breadcrumb trail, and their adventure with Rosina Sweet-tooth, a silly witch who wants to turn them into Gingerbread, only to end up as a cookie herself. Folk songs from Humperdinck’s opera accompany the production. Suitable for children 3 years and older. Reservations suggested. 12:30 pm and 2:30 pm.

Results 1–30 of 53.

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CNG: Community Newspaper Group