Today’s news:

Stop in the name of safety

The all-way stop sign at the corner of Avenue K and East 72nd Street has finally been restored.

Following a three-year fight to restore safe passage to Avenue K and East 72nd Street, Assemblyman Alan Maisel and Councilman Lew Fidler finally prevailed in their mission to convince the Department of Transportation that the all-way stop sign was still needed at this intersection.

In 2005, several stop signs were removed along the length of East 72nd Street in Georgetown. Both elected officials received dozens of complaints from constituents, who reported that this action resulted in frequent accidents at the affected intersections.

While DOT restored the other stops signs quickly, they stated that need was not indicated at Avenue K. The community strongly disagreed, and working closely with the Georgetown Civic Association, Maisel and Fidler accomplished their goal — the stop sign was finally replaced.

Assemblyman Maisel said, “The intersection of Avenue K and East 72nd Street has been the scene of dozens of accidents since the all-way stop signs were removed. I am pleased that the DOT has acknowledged this problem, and those who live in Georgetown or shop in the nearby stores will be safer as a result of the all way stop signs being returned to this intersection.”

Community leaders and elected officials came together to celebrate during the ribbon cutting ceremony.

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