Today’s news:

Funding cut to DiBrienza non−profit

The city’s yearly cash stream to a former City Councilmember’s not−for−profit company that became a political punching bag for those fighting to lead the 39th Councilmanic District has been plugged.

A review of the city’s budget, which was voted for on Friday, reveals that Stephen DiBrienza’s Neighborhood Assistance Corporation (NAC) will not receive any funding for 2010.

The NAC came under scrutiny earlier this year when the New York Post reported that the group had received $1.185 million in Council funding since its incorporation.

City records show that the group received $100,000 in FY2009. The group received $195,000 in funding in FY2008 thanks to additional funding from Brooklyn Heights City Councilmember David Yassky.

The Post reported that the NAC office on Fort Hamilton Parkway in Windsor Terrace was DiBrienza’s old district office. He had even listed himself as a part−time employee at one point, although the group currently only has one full−time employee.

Questions were raised about the funding after DiBrienza, who represented the 39th Councilmanic District in Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, Carroll Gardens and Kensington from 1986 to 2001 before being forced out by term limits, had thought about running for the seat in 2009.

Opponent Josh Skaller said that he was surprised that so much money was being given to NAC “with so little transparency and accountability” and had put in a Freedom of Information Law (FOIL) request for information about NAC and its funding requests.

The city’s Department of Youth and Community Development, which allocated most of the money to DiBrienza for after−school programs and basketball tournaments held at local schools, said that they reviewed NAC regularly. No red flags were found.

DiBrienza dropped out of the race in late March.

When contacted this week, DiBrienza said that there will be no City Council funding for NAC for FY 2010 because he did not apply for any funding.

But this doesn’t mean that NAC will be closing its doors.

“[NAC] will continue as a volunteer organization and will provide whatever services it can to the community,” he said. By Thomas Tracy

The city’s yearly cash stream to a former City Councilmember’s not−for−profit company that became a political punching bag for those fighting to lead the 39th Councilmanic District has been plugged.

A review of the city’s budget, which was voted for on Friday, reveals that Stephen DiBrienza’s Neighborhood Assistance Corporation (NAC) will not receive any funding for 2010.

The NAC came under scrutiny earlier this year when the New York Post reported that the group had received $1.185 million in Council funding since its incorporation.

City records show that the group received $100,000 in FY2009. The group received $195,000 in funding in FY2008 thanks to additional funding from Brooklyn Heights City Councilmember David Yassky.

The Post reported that the NAC office on Fort Hamilton Parkway in Windsor Terrace was DiBrienza’s old district office. He had even listed himself as a part−time employee at one point, although the group currently only has one full−time employee.

Questions were raised about the funding after DiBrienza, who represented the 39th Councilmanic District in Park Slope, Windsor Terrace, Carroll Gardens and Kensington from 1986 to 2001 before being forced out by term limits, had thought about running for the seat in 2009.

Opponent Josh Skaller said that he was surprised that so much money was being given to NAC “with so little transparency and accountability” and had put in a Freedom of Information Law (FOIL) request for information about NAC and its funding requests.

The city’s Department of Youth and Community Development, which allocated most of the money to DiBrienza for after−school programs and basketball tournaments held at local schools, said that they reviewed NAC regularly. No red flags were found.

DiBrienza dropped out of the race in late March.

When contacted this week, DiBrienza said that there will be no City Council funding for NAC for FY 2010 because he did not apply for any funding.

But this doesn’t mean that NAC will be closing its doors.

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