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Speedsters ‘stack up’ nicely against the world

On your marks, get set and stack up.

Ambidextrous Public School 254 students joined hundreds of thousands of stack-tacular kids and adults %u2013 from coast to coast and continent to continent %u2013 to break the record for the most people sport stacking at multiple locations in one day, set by the Guinness World Records and the World Sport Stacking Association (WSSA).

The industrious bunch up-stacked and down-stacked specially designed cups called “Speed Stacks” in designated patterns at lightning speed for a half-hour, competing against the clock in relay teams for the fourth annual global competition.

Last year, 222,560 stackers, representing 1,343 schools and organizations from 13 countries and all 50 US states stacked in unison to set a new world record.

The 2009 record was undetermined at press time.

According to WSSA, the sport originated as “cup stacking” in the early 1980s in Southern California. Today, it is overseen by the WSSA and practiced in more than 30,000 schools and youth organizations around the world, promoting hand-eye coordination, versatility, concentration, quickness and %u2013 of course %u2013 fun.

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