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The ID of Stan, and his toothbrushes

Brooklyn Daily

I needed some cash for my latest trip so I stopped at the bank on the way to the airport. Before consummating the transaction, it was necessary for me to show my driver’s license to the pretty teller. I didn’t return the photo ID license to my wallet because I knew I’d have to produce it again when checking in. Then again, for the third time that morning, I confirmed my identity when passing through the security line before boarding.

We landed on time and, immediately after picking up our luggage, I scooted over to the car rental counter where, naturally, I had to produce my driver’s license again. Hey, you know that commercial about choosing any car in the lane? My roommate and I selected a brand we’ve never driven before. We were thinking that renting is a great way of testing a brand before buying.

As we left the airport, Carol reminded me that I didn’t want to pack the used toothbrushes. I recalled saying that we’ll stop off for new ones on the way to the hotel (more on that coming up). I charged the new brushes along with a few other items on my Master Card and, as the cashier requested, I had to show my photo ID once again. And still once more when we checked into the Marriott. Someday I will tell you about the sensational prices we paid for the hotels and car by bidding on Priceline.

To prevent fraud I willingly show appropriate ID wherever and whenever I am asked. Some states are passing laws demanding proper ID at the polls for the same reason. Why is there so much resistance to showing it on Election Day? According to the American Civil Liberties Union, new laws requiring photo ID on Election Day in several states will “disenfranchise people of color, the elderly, people with disabilities and students who are less likely to have a current state driver’s license or state identification.”

That does make a lot of sense, but my thinking is if America wants to prevent voter fraud — and if those just mentioned can make it to the polls to vote — then they can make it to the proper municipality to be photographed for an official identification card. Doing that will take a lot less energy and ink than it will to fight it. Furthermore, if they are sincerely interested in voting in the next presidential election they have a whole year to obtain ID.

• • •

When was the last time you bought a new toothbrush? Most people say that they buy a new brush every three months. I wait for a sale and buy six or eight at a time. We needed new brushes and stopped to shop on our way to the hotel. I couldn’t help but notice where the brushes were manufactured. The Colgate 360s are manufactured in Switzerland. Colgate Maxwhites, China. China also for the Arm and Hammer Spinbrush. Oral B Vitality. The Oral B Complete Action is made in Germany. Colgate’s battery operated Transformer brushes are made in Canada. It took a few minutes before we located the G-U-M Brand of toothbrushes which were made in the good old U.S. of A. Are they any good? I am StanGershbein@Bellsouth.net telling you to ask me that question in another week or two.

Stanley Gershbein's column appears on BrooklynDaily.com every Monday. He can be reached via e-mail at StanGershbein@bellsouth.net

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Reader Feedback

Neil Friedman from Sheepshead Bay says:
Thanks so much for getting to the tooth of the matter.
But next time, get there a little faster.
Nov. 2, 2011, 11:08 pm

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