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Fantasia slithers into young hearts

Brooklyn Daily

Photo gallery

1/6
Fearless Matteo Gebb, 5, dares to pet while lil’ brother Alec admires from afar with mom Juliana.
2/6
Caleb Joseph of Crown Heights might be just a year old, but he already knows how to spot a good lookin’ lady!
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Crown Heights cutie Tzviki Gaerman, 2, isn’t afraid to share the spotlight with a great, big snake.
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Park Slope curiosity hunter Sebastian Bertinelli, 4, leads the charge for 5-year-old Mylo (center) and Alastair McLaughlin, 3.
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Hiya! Park Slope tyke Tess Nealon Raskin, 7, goes head-to-head with the scintillating serpent.
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Wow! Clinton Hill’s Farrah Mussa, 4, bags herself some impressive bragging rights!

The Brooklyn Children’s Museum kicked off the holidays asp-iciously by flaunting one of the world’s largest snakes in front of agog visitors on Sunday.

Fantasia, am albino Burmese python who is longer than a giraffe is tall, crawled under the skin of pint-sized bravehearts who didn’t wriggle out of the opportunity to have a close encounter with the archive’s 20-foot-long ambassador.

Adventurous types were smitten at first gander.

The Gebb siblings of DUMBO — Matteo, 5, and 2-year-old Alec — inched towards Fanny, gently stroking the comely critter’s sun yellow scales under the watchful eye of handler Jared Aston as proud mom Juliana cooed over her fearless boys.

“Wow!” kvelled the pair, notching up impressive bragging rights.

Afraid? No way! That was the unspoken message of Crown Heights cutie Tzviki Gaerman, 2, who posed beside the behemoth like a budding supermodel, smiling serenely for the shutterbug while resting her hand calmly upon the pretty monster.

The hair-raising spectacle was part of the “Fantasia on the Loose” campaign to bring more coppers into the archive’s coffers, ensuring that its eye-popping menagerie continues to educate and entertain for years to come. Deep-pocketed fans, who shelled out a minimum of $250, were immortalized on a Fantasia mural and received a private tour of the collection, featuring turtles, lizards, frogs and other fascinating brutes.

“These animals are intricate parts of the museum’s family and help to engage children in real hands-on learning,” bragged spokeswoman Anne-Rhea Smith.

That goes for deceased beasts, too — Fanny’s showcase commemorated the lives of Elizabeth the iguana and Sunkist the corn snake, who both passed away this fall.

Reach reporter Shavana Abruzzo at sabruzzo@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2529.

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