Today’s news:

Alleged killer of Michael Jones should be tried — in Mexico

Mexico is the place for Orlando Orea

Brooklyn Daily

He was a beloved youth soccer coach who came from England to do a little good and make a life for himself in America, where the streets are still paved with gold. Sadly, Michael Jones left this world on a cold dark night on a street in Union Square alone, away from his home and far too soon, allegedly at the hands of Orlando Orea, aka Orlando Guiterrez, aka Orlando Estevas, an illegal alien from Mexico.

And before all you “Oh it’s a poor country they just want to come here for a better life” liberals get up in arms, let me remind you if he came here legally and was “documented” (nice word means bupkis), he would not have had the need to have multiple aliases.

Orlando was able to elude capture by purchasing a one-way ticket on an Aero Mexico flight back home just minutes before his name went up on a no-fly list.

Michael Jones is going back home, legally, but in a coffin.

Now, authorities are trying to get Orlando “what ever his name” back. They sort of know where he is and they are working with Mexican agencies and Interpol to track him down so they can hopefully extradite him.

Well ain’t that a hoot.

He didn’t have any problem sneaking into the country. He obviously didn’t have any problem obtaining several aliases so he could work here illegally, and he sure as shoot didn’t have any problems coming up with the cash to get out of Dodge.

Now, the government will spend hundreds of thousands of tax dollars in man hours and legal haggling just to get him back. To do what? Try him, convict him and then give him a cockamamie sentence that some savvy state-appointed attorney will plea bargain for, with some time served behind bars? Three squares, a roof over his head, medical care and his own room all on our tab. If it wasn’t so criminal it would be laughable.

I don’t think the prisons down Mexico-way are as comfy.

I say convict him and sentence him to life in a Mexican prison. Let the Mexican government support him. After all he is their citizen, not ours.

So he was undocumented and illegally here, probably didn’t pay his fair share of the taxes either, took work from a legally documented citizen, committed a heinous crime, and now escaped to his home country, where he left in the first place. And we’re trying to get him back? So we can support him for the rest of his life?

I’m sorry, how much more ridiculous can this get?

Not for Nuthin,™ in two more weeks this country will be holding an election for a new leader and new policies. Hopefully the next one will have a better handle on illegal immigration.

Follow me on Twitter @JDelBuono.

Joanna DelBuono writes about national — and international — issues, every Wednesday on BrooklynDaily.com. E-mail her at jdelbuono@cnglocal.com.

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Reader Feedback

Alex from Mill Basin says:
This is the biggest load of nonsense I've ever read.

A crime was committed in the United States, in the municipality of New York City. Justice should be served in the city where the crime was committed.
Oct. 17, 2012, 5:30 pm
Bif Wellington from Park Avenue says:
Maybe we should send Joanna DelBouno to an Italian penitentiary for writing this article.
Oct. 29, 2012, 5:56 pm
Charles Pavarini from White plains, NY says:
Justice should be served in the city where the crime took place... IF YOU ARE A LEGAL CITIZEN. They should make an example of this case, for the rest of te illegal immigrants coming to this country.
Nov. 19, 2012, 4:58 am

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